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3 Tips to Limit Borrowing for School

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Before you apply for additional student loans, make sure you're not borrowing too much. Doing so can make repayment painful. Use the tips below first and then only borrow what you need.*


And if you determine you've borrowed too much for this year already, you may be able to cancel part of the loan before all the funds are sent (or "disbursed") to your college. Check in with your financial aid office to see if you can still cancel part of the loan.


Don't Borrow for Extras

You should only borrow money that you need to pay college costs, not for incidentals or other items you want.

Check out these big money savers for college students.

Student loans should be used for any education-related expenses such as tuition, room and board, meal plans, book and even transportation costs. Those loan funds shouldn't be used to decorate your dorm room with the trendiest items when you may already have most of what you need at home. The newest gaming equipment, spring break trips and pizza for all your friends on a Thursday night also shouldn't be paid for with student loan funds.

Think about it. Do you really want to be paying back that money, plus interest, in 10 years when the pizza is long gone and the décor and gaming items are out of date?

Work a Few Hours a Week

If you want to pick up the latest multiplayer game for a break from studying or want to head to the beach for spring break, think about getting a part-time job during the school year. Working just 10 hours a week can help put some extra cash in your checking account and may help your grades by forcing you to budget your time wisely.

It would probably even be better to use your paycheck to buy needed supplies like books or pay some of the smaller fees charged by your school so that you don't have to use loans for those expenses. And don't forget, you can always use any money earned to make monthly interest payments on your current student loans to prevent the loan amount from increasing while you're in school.

Maximize Your Course Load

Want to do one more thing to keep your loan balance from getting out of control? Be sure you're taking as many classes as you can so that you graduate on time. Does your college consider 12 hours full-time enrollment but allow you to take up to 18 hours at the same tuition cost? If so, try to make the most of that time. If your grades and schedule allows, consider taking 18 hours at a time. If you can't manage 18 hours effectively, taking 15 hours can help you stay on track for graduating in four years better than 12 hours will. And graduating in four years instead of five or more can significantly keep your loan costs down.


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